Fundamental #1: Posture & Stability - How it affects your game, what to look for, and how you can improve yours to make more consistent contact and hit the ball farther.

Golf can be extremely complicated if you make it that way.

Contrary to what the internet may have you believe, it is not a game of mastering 1000 or even 100 different skills.

In reality, it can be broken down into only 4 fundamentals that every pro and elite golfer out there accels at.

  1. Posture & Stability - can you stay in balance and maintain a neutral spine angle
  2. Sequencing & Deceleration - can you time your swing correctly to create speed
  3. Face to Path Control - can you hit the ball straight
  4. Mental Game - do you let one bad shot ruin your round or do you allow negative self talk to become self-sabotaging and lead to all the misses you want to avoid

There you have it, the four concepts that can entirely change your game.

Master these concepts and you will be a single-digit handicapper at worst-case scenario, at best we'll be watching you play on the tour soon.

Now let's dig deeper into these concepts.

#1 - Posture & Stability to create Solid & Consistent Contact

Posture is the first component of creating solid and consistent contact. To understand what good posture looks like I'm first going to show you some examples of bad posture.

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So Now you see what bad posture looks like...

Here are the Posture principles you see in 99% of professionals and good ball strikers.

  • Neutral or flat spine angle - from tailbone to shoulder blades - on down the line video as you see above you should be able to draw a line and see your spine flat to it with no space between. not arched (like you see in the first image above) or rounded (like in the second)
  • Head should drop forward only slightly - 10-20 degrees is tour average. Amateurs often are 30-40 degrees forward relative to the rest of their spine angle.
  • Arms are hanging below shoulders with hands ranging between the base of the neck and the bottom of the shoulder blades - an example to follow. Green indicates the area you see 90% of professionals hang their arms in at setup. Many amateurs reach their hands and arms way too far (in the red zone) from their bodies and end up causing other negative tendencies.
  • Weight evenly distributed between toes and heels - we see a lot of students come in with too much weight on toes or heels and it prevents any possibility of a stable swing. You'll see every pro and most good players or single-digit handicappers set up with their weight evenly distributed at setup.

Here are some examples of what I was talking about above

Tony Finau shows you an athletic setup with a neutral spine angle, neck in only slighlty forward position, arms hanging below his shoulders and weight evenly distributed between toes and heels.
Jon Rahm is a great example of an excellent setup. His back is flat to the line drawn, his neck is the normal 10-20 degrees forward of spine angle. His arms reach slightly more than Brooks' but not so much that he'd be in the "red zone".
Brooks Koepka demonstrates an excellent setup position with great posture, relaxed arms hanging directly below his shoulders. The red area is where we see many amateurs go wrong with their setup.

Here are the Posture principles you see in 99% of professionals and good ball strikers.

  • Neutral or flat spine angle - from tailbone to shoulder blades - on down the line video as you see above you should be able to draw a line and see your spine flat to it with no space between. not arched (like you see in the first image above) or rounded (like in the second)
  • Head should drop forward only slightly - 10-20 degrees is tour average. Amateurs often are 30-40 degrees forward relative to the rest of their spine angle.
  • Arms are hanging below shoulders with hands ranging between the base of the neck and the bottom of the shoulder blades - an example to follow. Green indicates the area you see 90% of professionals hang their arms in at setup. Many amateurs reach their hands and arms way too far (in the red zone) from their bodies and end up causing other negative tendencies.
  • Weight evenly distributed between toes and heels - we see a lot of students come in with too much weight on toes or heels and it prevents any possibility of a stable swing. You'll see every pro and most good players or single-digit handicappers set up with their weight evenly distributed at setup.

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